INTERACTIVE TIMELINES

A satellite resource for The Society for Advancement

A nine year old girl recently refused to stand up to sing our national anthem during a school assembly, declaring objections to their content. “We are not young and free” she said, “and we do not share our boundless plains.” A social media storm ensued. Some politicians and media personalities called for her expulsion from school and others leapt to her defence, denouncing the anthem as meaningless. A wealth of questions rose from her simple protest. Questions relating to the validity of an anthem that contrasts with national behaviours. Questions relating to her right to protest and to free speech. Questions doubting her, and her family’s allegiance to Australia. Questions about national identity and the image Australians want to portray to the wider world.  


Questions arose in my mind too, igniting a desire to uncover Australia’s attitude to the many migrants disembarking from boats and planes, in recent centuries, with dreams of making Australia home.  How well were they received? Were they welcomed to communities or shunned as outsiders? Were they supported in their bid to integrate and build this nation, or left to fend for themselves? How long was their journey to acceptance and what did they have to do to earn it?


In order to unpack the stories of migration and attitudes towards newcomers, a starting place is needed.  Colonial settlers forced their culture on an already inhabited land and age old histories of prejudice and presumption, especially with regard to certain foreigners, have moulded modern Australia.

 

INTERACTIVE TIMELINES

A satellite resource for The Society for Advancement

A nine year old girl recently refused to stand up to sing our national anthem during a school assembly, declaring objections to their content. “We are not young and free” she said, “and we do not share our boundless plains.” A social media storm ensued. Some politicians and media personalities called for her expulsion from school and others leapt to her defence, denouncing the anthem as meaningless. A wealth of questions rose from her simple protest. Questions relating to the validity of an anthem that contrasts with national behaviours. Questions relating to her right to protest and to free speech. Questions doubting her, and her family’s allegiance to Australia. Questions about national identity and the image Australians want to portray to the wider world.  


Questions arose in my mind too, igniting a desire to uncover Australia’s attitude to the many migrants disembarking from boats and planes, in recent centuries, with dreams of making Australia home.  How well were they received? Were they welcomed to communities or shunned as outsiders? Were they supported in their bid to integrate and build this nation, or left to fend for themselves? How long was their journey to acceptance and what did they have to do to earn it?


In order to unpack the stories of migration and attitudes towards newcomers, a starting place is needed.  Colonial settlers forced their culture on an already inhabited land and age old histories of prejudice and presumption, especially with regard to certain foreigners, have moulded modern Australia.

 

AUSTRALIA AND THE MIGRANT 1860-1890

Around 500,000 migrants travelled to Australia during the Gold Rush era of 1850 to 1860, Mainly from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, China and the USA.  The 1860's onwards heralded a new era of migration. 

Explorers, Surveyors, Entrepreneurs, Businessmen, Clergymen and Philanthropists were all watching for opportunities to prosper in New South Wales and the newly formed Queensland.

 
afghan-cameleers-1980-689x500.jpg

1860 - JUNE

Afghan and Pakistani Cameleers

From 1860, 20,000 camels and their handlers from Afghanistan and Pakistan were shipped to Australia.


On 9 June 1860, 24 camels and three cameleers arrived at Port Melbourne, to join the pioneering Burke and Wills expedition.

Australia's Muslim Cameleers
Australian Geographic
February 2010

Screen Shot 2018-10-17 at 1.57.06 PM_edi

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afghan-cameleers-1980-689x500.jpg

1860 - JUNE

Afghan and Pakistani Cameleers

From 1860, 20,000 camels and their handlers from Afghanistan and Pakistan were shipped to Australia.


On 9 June 1860, 24 camels and three cameleers arrived at Port Melbourne, to join the pioneering Burke and Wills expedition.

Australia's Muslim Cameleers
Australian Geographic
February 2010

Screen Shot 2018-10-17 at 1.57.06 PM_edi

TEAM MEMBER

Job Title

This is your Team Member description. Use this space to write a brief description of what this team member does, or add a short bio. You can include relevant degrees, experience or other special qualifications they may have.

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TEAM MEMBER

Job Title

This is your Team Member description. Use this space to write a brief description of what this team member does, or add a short bio. You can include relevant degrees, experience or other special qualifications they may have.

 
afghan-cameleers-1980-689x500.jpg

1860 - JUNE

Afghan and Pakistani Cameleers

From 1860, 20,000 camels and their handlers from Afghanistan and Pakistan were shipped to Australia.


On 9 June 1860, 24 camels and three cameleers arrived at Port Melbourne, to join the pioneering Burke and Wills expedition.

Australia's Muslim Cameleers
Australian Geographic
February 2010

Young Man with Checkerd Shirt

TEAM MEMBER

Job Title

This is your Team Member description. Use this space to write a brief description of what this team member does, or add a short bio. You can include relevant degrees, experience or other special qualifications they may have.

Young Man with Glasses

TEAM MEMBER

Job Title

This is your Team Member description. Use this space to write a brief description of what this team member does, or add a short bio. You can include relevant degrees, experience or other special qualifications they may have.